Donate to Remove ads

Got a credit card? use our Credit Card & Finance Calculators

Thanks to 87investor,longview,Sussexlad,niord,staffordian, for Donating to support the site

Marmalade - How Soon?

incorporating Recipes and Cooking
JohnnyCyclops
2 Lemon pips
Posts: 177
Joined: November 15th, 2016, 9:19 pm
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 10 times

Marmalade - How Soon?

#113864

Postby JohnnyCyclops » January 28th, 2018, 7:37 pm

I made my first (ever) marmalade today, using a Delia recipe, halved. 1lb Seville oranges, 1 lemon, 2pts water, 2lb granulated sugar. I thought it would make ~3lb but in the end it's only around 1.7lb, filling 2/3rds of a tall kilner jar. The scrappings from the pan tasted thick and sweet.

So my main question is, how soon to start eating it? Does marmalade benefit from settling a bit and maturing (and if so, for how long), or can I jump in tomorrow for breakfast? It's only in the one large jar, and I expect if it's very tasty it won't last long at all!

As an aside, Delia (her "Complete Illustrated Cookery Course" book from 30 years ago, but still my "go to" for most basic/British recipes) poo-poos jam thermometers and recommends a hard boil for 15 mins and then test the set on a saucer chilled in the freezer. I do have a thermometer and it was reading the 'required' 104c after 10 mins but I kept boiling it hard until the full 15 mins were up. What I hadn't spotted was some of the peel catching on bottom of the pan and burning/caramelising a little, as I only stirred once during the boil (being unsure if I should, really). The frozen saucer test at 15 mins told me I had a set, so I turned it off and left to cool in the pan 20 mins (per Delia), during which is got darker and darker, and thickened too. I liken the finished product to Olde English marmalade (not sure if it's still in production!), rather than something lighter, like Silver Shred. Does boiling it beyond the 104c set point also explain why I've seemingly got less volume of finished product? I did use golden granulated cane sugar, rather than the white. Not sure why, just seems a bit healthier? That might have helped the colouring.

I also used a whole lemon and sliced the peel in (it appears Delia might have only used the juice), whereas for a true halving of the recipe I should have used half a lemon. I'm led to understand the lemon gives pectin to help create the set, so have I 'over-pectined' (if that's a term) and hence got quite a thick set (so it seems)?

JC

Midsmartin
2 Lemon pips
Posts: 173
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 7:18 am
Has thanked: 18 times
Been thanked: 74 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#113875

Postby Midsmartin » January 28th, 2018, 8:54 pm

I eat it just as soon as it has cooled enough to not burn my mouth. After that it should keep happily for at least 10+ years in the cupboard.

I've made marmalade lots of times. I'm an addict. I confess. Visitors to our house depart with marmalade pressed into their hands whether they like it or not.

It's quite hard to find precise details of the chemistry of setting. But you need a combination of temperature and acidity. If there isn't enough sugar you won't reach the required temperature until you've boiled off enough water to increase the concentration and hence the boiling point. Though I usually cut the sugar by 10% or so because it makes me feel virtuous and hope I get a tarter result. I don't know really. I don't know how necessary lemon is in marmalade as it must be acidic already, but it is certainly needed for strawberry jam. I like the extra flavour of lemon, so I usually add lots.

Yes, using golden sugar etc will darken it a bit. Letting it get hotter probably starts caramelising the sugar - even more so if you let it stick on the bottom a bit where it will be hotter still. I read somewhere that overheating/overboiling 'damages' the pectin and makes a set more difficult.. I'm a little suspicious of this claim, but maybe it applies in some circumstances. I think you must ignore the time to boil the jam - it is just a guide. Time is irrelevant - the only thing that matters is achieving the correct temperature in the presence of some acidity.

I've tried several methods and have settled on this one as the easiest/fastest. I tried Delia's cook-oranges-whole method and didn't like it.

Chop oranges in half. Place large sieve over pan and juice oranges & lemon through an old fashioned wooden orange juicer. Much better than those glass dish type ones. Discard pips from the sieve. Most recipes say to tie them in a bag on the side of the pan, but in fact the pectin is mostly in the pith, so they don't appear to be necessary. I did put quite a lot of pounded cardamom pods in a bag in my last batch. It gives a great flavour, but very subtle.. perhaps a good thing.

Chop Orange (& a lemon or two if you like lemony bits) halves into 2 or 3 again to set a maximum size for peel chunks, and then I feed them through the slicing attachment on our kitchen mixer/blender, saving hours of wrist strain over the hand chopping that is usually advised. Sift through the resulting debris and slice up any big bits to taste.

I used limes one year, and lime juice gave a great flavour, but lime peel seems harder to cook - google says to cook the lime peel separately for longer then add it to the oranges.

Then simmer peel+juice+water gently with lid mostly on pan for 90 minutes or so. Peel must be soft and cooked as allegedly it will not soften more after adding sugar. I haven't tested this claim.

Finally add sugar and boil. I don't have a thermometer, so I use the saucer test. If I think it's nearing being ready, I turn off the heat while waiting for a test result - I want to bottle it the instant I see that crinkly skin forming so I get soft marmalade, not engineering grade. Only if it's not ready do I bring it back to the boil for a minute or two more.

I see no need to wait 20 minutes for bottling. I think this is just so you don't sue Delia if you pour hot marmalade over yourself. I just get a measuring jug once the steam has dispersed and pour it in the jars. I dry/sterilise jars in the oven and so they are still warm. Conceivably this isn't an absolute necessity either - I top the jars with lids that are unsterilised (I'm unsure about oven proofness of the rubbery seal around used jam jar lids) and they never seem get things growing in them. Possibly there's a risk of a weak cold jar cracking if you pour 104 degrees marmalade in?

Many recipes say to scoop off foam from the top. There is no need, and it disperses on its own after a few minutes cooking if you leave it. Maybe if you wish to enter a competition with it you get more transparent marmalade, but I don't care on my toast.

Some insist you must put those wax disks on top. Again, there is no point if you recycle lids from commercial jars that make airtight seals.

JohnnyCyclops
2 Lemon pips
Posts: 177
Joined: November 15th, 2016, 9:19 pm
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#113890

Postby JohnnyCyclops » January 28th, 2018, 11:47 pm

Midsmartin wrote:Visitors to our house depart with marmalade pressed into their hands whether they like it or not.


In a jar, I'd hope! Although I recall my younger brother as a toddler seemingly to always have marmalade peel stuck in his hair.

Thank you so much for the time you took to reply. I did half guess it's ready to eat now (as I was scrapping warm bits from the empty pan). I'm not sure it will last 10 years!

Your post makes me realise there's always so much to learn around baking, cooking and preserving, including the science of why and how something works (as I write this at 11.30pm I've just finished shaping two sourdough loaves to prove overnight and bake in the morning - two years ago I had no clue about sourdough, now I've got a starter so virile it's pouring out of the kilner jar on the worktop!). And that sourdough should go lovely with the marmalade in the morning.

I too slightly skimped the sugar, by about 5% though, for 'virtue' but it makes sense that the temperate wouldn't get above 100c if it's just or mostly water, and hence a need to maintain a decent volume of sugar.

Delia's recipe was an uncovered pan for two hours simmer. Mine was turned down so low I was getting a little steam and the occasional bubble on the surface. But I could tell the water had reduced by maybe a third. That might also explain why I think I've ended up with a thicker set, but I'll check when I taste it. And why I've got ~1.7lb from 3lb of fruit/sugar.

I did put the pips and pith in the muslin bag, BUT your tip on how to squeeze/strain was better than mine with the glass juicer :-)

Delia also said if you don't get a set on the chilled plate then keep boiling another 10 minutes and try again, but that seems an awful long time - and also to add more lemon juice (acid). And I guess in the time it took me to test the first set I kept boiling another three or four minutes anyway. I like your idea to take off the heat while testing for the set, so as not to overboil (which I now think I did - I could probably have test for set at 10 mins once 104c was reached). I might also trust a bit more to the thermometer and test once I'm at 104c, and not based on the time boiled.

FINAL QUESTION - I've made this now because of the Seville oranges in the greengrocers. But you imply you make a lot, so I presume it's ok to use 'ordinary' oranges, or other citrus, throughout the year. Correct?

Midsmartin
2 Lemon pips
Posts: 173
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 7:18 am
Has thanked: 18 times
Been thanked: 74 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#113904

Postby Midsmartin » January 29th, 2018, 9:06 am

I've never tried using ordinary oranges. I'm sure it works and makes a sort of jam, but there is probably a reason that we don't see it on the shelves in Tesco. I think I googled it once and you need to be aware that sweet oranges have less pectin, and the peel needs more cooking to soften it as it's denser etc.

Personally I'd make apricot jam as your next attempt. Again, I usually add loads of lemon or lime juice. As well as making it set reliably, it's tasty. Again, you don't want your jam to be too solid.

When you halve the quantities of your recipe, you should probably reduce the boiling time a bit too. You probably turn down your hob a bit for a smaller pan, but you're probably putting the same amount of heat or only slightly less through half the volume of liquid, so I'd expect you to be evaporating a higher percentage of the water away in 10 minutes than the recipe anticipated, and heating it up faster.

Anyway, Iv'e done a jam cupboard audit this morning, and I seem to have c. 18 pots of marmalade of different vintages, and maybe 30+ pots of jam including last year's apricot, some crab apple jelly, & a jar of 2008 Elderberry syrup, and some I've acquired from swaps with people.

Sourdough though - I'd like to try this, but it seems to require a higher degree of planning and organisation than is likely in our household to have a starter ready when you want it, and to maintain one. I did try once and it was OK but not great. The starter lurked in the back of our fridge for several months afterwards while I was waiting to make a second batch, until I eventually had to chip the dried remains out of the container into the compost bin.

JohnnyCyclops
2 Lemon pips
Posts: 177
Joined: November 15th, 2016, 9:19 pm
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#113943

Postby JohnnyCyclops » January 29th, 2018, 11:27 am

Ah, so Sevilles it is, at this time of year. I might have a second go next weekend and see if I get a lighter result.

Tasted it this morning and thick and dark, with bitter undertones under the initial sweetness. Absolutely lovely, but I am biased! One or two 'chewy' bits of peel that I'll put down to caramelising on the bottom of the pan.

I used a wide deep pan, one of the few non-sticks I've got, so the surface (for a 1/2 quantity) will be greater and evaporate more. Again, probably needs some playing around with - practice makes perfect. But the depth of the pan helped in the fast boil stage as that came 2/3rd up the pan height.

Good tip on trying a jam next. I have made rhubarb chutney the last couple of summers, which is similar principles but doesn't need to set. My late father always had a cupboard in the unheated porch full of chutneys, relishes and the occasional jam. I inherited the sugar themometer from him.

Sourdough - yes, my starter 'died' last autumn, growing an orange/green mould that I'm sure isn't what was planned! I started over again a few weeks ago, and it takes a bit of prep and planning (a week's lead time to create a new starter). I always feel a bit guilty pouring 3/4s away to do a refresh, but then recall it's just flour and water. I don't consume enough bread to be baking every day, plus it can tie me to the house (if it's a daytime bake) or have me in and out of the kitchen like last evening, for an overnight rise.

That said, the bread and marmalade tasted excellent this morning. The only thing I hadn't made was the butter!

Dod101
Lemon Half
Posts: 6395
Joined: October 10th, 2017, 11:33 am
Has thanked: 1459 times
Been thanked: 2546 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#113956

Postby Dod101 » January 29th, 2018, 11:59 am

All of this reminds me of what my mother used to do at this time of year. I like marmalade but am probably now put off for life by the amount of sugar it takes (apparently not good for you) and I no longer like the sweetness anyway. When I had a bigger garden I had a lot of summer fruit and used to make jam which I gave away to unsuspecting friends.

Very interesting though that people still indulge in these 'old fashioned' practises.

Dod

didds
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 2864
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 12:04 pm
Has thanked: 1267 times
Been thanked: 437 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#113957

Postby didds » January 29th, 2018, 12:06 pm

I love making jam from our garden's produce, or what we get given by friends, or is going daftly cheap in the market.

That said I'm about the only person that eats ti mostly!

QWe do make chutney, but not in great quantities as we don;t use it overly. Wife probably more than i do.

marmalade - my mum makes it every year so we get several jars. I was impressed with the "mamade" stuff and have a can of that to try when mum's marmalade has finished.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com ... L1476_.jpg

I use to try and make our own pickle and picallilli but could never make it hopw I wanted it to taste - so now rely on commercial varieties.

Which leads me onto soup... all our soup is home made.

didds

Dod101
Lemon Half
Posts: 6395
Joined: October 10th, 2017, 11:33 am
Has thanked: 1459 times
Been thanked: 2546 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#113960

Postby Dod101 » January 29th, 2018, 12:27 pm

Yes I make good home made soup and would never buy stuff in a can.

Dod

dspp
Lemon Half
Posts: 5856
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 10:53 am
Has thanked: 4857 times
Been thanked: 1685 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#114260

Postby dspp » January 30th, 2018, 2:05 pm

@JC:

I do 3kg of sevilles at this time of year each year for ritual marmalade, using the Delia recipe. Some comments if it helps, some of which are repetitions but hey ho:

- There is pectin in the pips. For years I just used an old (but clean) hanky as my bag which I knotted and clothes pegged to the side of the pan. At the end it was always difficult to squeeze out, but unarguably there is pectin in that lump. What the proportion of pectin in pips vs skin is I can't comment on. Using muslin cloth makes this easier (and safer), and saves on hankies.
- I use any spare lemons left around, normally about 2 per kg I guess.
- Personally I use the hand chopping and squeezing method, friends do the half baking method. It doesn't seem to make a difference. Mine is a medium cut. I always sharpen my knives before I do it.
- Use the largest pan you can as the boil is important. I was bought a maslin pan by the family and it makes a lot of difference.
- The boil goes nuclear when you add the sugar, so make sure you have a good big wooden spoon to keep your hands away from the liquid spatters. Lightweight wooden spoons bend, so use heavyweight and take them out when not stirring. The ones with the flat edged bottom are best.
- Stir fairly often, you definitely don't want burnt bits. But don't sit there forever at a low heat either - in my case I need to move it off the Aga sometimes and onto the normal stove, as the Aga temp falls too low with a big pan after a while. Aim for that roiling boil look.
- Butter may help with froth, but really I don't bother.
- I wash jars and lids well by hand, then dishwasher them. Then I set them out on top of the Aga (I always do this at a friend's and she has an Aga) to dry out. The drying out is important as you are trying to kill off any bacteria etc and they don't like being dried out. The last thing you want is icky drops of dirty washing up water.
- I use the crinkle test, never thermometers. I have never over-done it (can you ?), but I have under-done it. I try to aim for a medium set but if anything I try to err on the well set side.
- I don't do paper inserts. As far as I can see it introduces a contamination risk as modern jars (even recycled ones which is what I use) are so much better than they used to be.
- Line the jars up in matched pairs with the corresponding lids. Check they fit. You can't check when they are nuclear.
- Fill without too much air gap at the top, but also try to avoid getting jam up onto the lid.
- Once ladled out into jars then immediately but gently pop the lids on. Then as soon as you can bear it tighten firmly. That way the small air gap cools and pulls a slight vacuum which energises the sealing face.
- In my experience there is a slight increase in set for the first month or so, but not very much. If you haven't got it set then lob it all back in the pan and carry on going.
- my mother used to use kilner jars and hers would last years. Occasional strays last 2-years in my house, but the majority are eaten in the first year. The 3kg matches household(s) needs for me & mine.
- Oh and often I buy the sevilles now but then freeze them to get to a convenient weekend for doing the job.

regards, dspp

kempiejon
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 1643
Joined: November 5th, 2016, 10:30 am
Has thanked: 5 times
Been thanked: 429 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#114263

Postby kempiejon » January 30th, 2018, 2:17 pm

I like to use one of these https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B072JXXF3S/ ... B0001IWVGW for jams and chutneys as I am clumsy with a ladle.

JohnnyCyclops
2 Lemon pips
Posts: 177
Joined: November 15th, 2016, 9:19 pm
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#114365

Postby JohnnyCyclops » January 30th, 2018, 8:40 pm

kempiejon wrote:I like to use one of these https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B072JXXF3S/ ... B0001IWVGW for jams and chutneys as I am clumsy with a ladle.


Yep, wanted one of those but couldn't find on my Sunday morning buys at the local Robert Dyas (but did have the muslin squares, a new Kilner (not that a second was needed in the end - I'm practically forbidden from buying any more as we have load already but usually storing a variety of teas, coffees, chutneys, sourdough starter and some pickles).

Will definitely look for one again - the Kilner jar's neck was wide enough for a juidicious 3/4 full ladle, but I could see that being impractical with a standard size jam jar.

JohnnyCyclops
2 Lemon pips
Posts: 177
Joined: November 15th, 2016, 9:19 pm
Has thanked: 27 times
Been thanked: 10 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#114368

Postby JohnnyCyclops » January 30th, 2018, 8:50 pm

dspp wrote:@JC:

I do 3kg of sevilles at this time of year each year for ritual marmalade, using the Delia recipe. Some comments if it helps, some of which are repetitions but hey ho:

- There is pectin in the pips. For years I just used an old (but clean) hanky as my bag which I knotted and clothes pegged to the side of the pan. At the end it was always difficult to squeeze out, but unarguably there is pectin in that lump. What the proportion of pectin in pips vs skin is I can't comment on. Using muslin cloth makes this easier (and safer), and saves on hankies.


I'd read that too, but found even having left the bag to cool for 5 minutes or so it was still almost too hot to handle and squeeze, but I did get a lot of good oozing stuff from it and back in the pan.

dspp wrote: - The boil goes nuclear when you add the sugar, so make sure you have a good big wooden spoon to keep your hands away from the liquid spatters. Lightweight wooden spoons bend, so use heavyweight and take them out when not stirring. The ones with the flat edged bottom are best.
- Stir fairly often, you definitely don't want burnt bits. But don't sit there forever at a low heat either - in my case I need to move it off the Aga sometimes and onto the normal stove, as the Aga temp falls too low with a big pan after a while. Aim for that roiling boil look.
- Butter may help with froth, but really I don't bother.


I'll know to stir in the boil stage now and again to stop the sticking/burning. I had full heat on a larger gas ring.

dspp wrote: - I use the crinkle test, never thermometers. I have never over-done it (can you ?), but I have under-done it. I try to aim for a medium set but if anything I try to err on the well set side.


I think as I've inherited the thermometer I might as well use it, but take its reading to then do a crinkle test. That way I'm not simply timing to 15 mins (per Delia) before the crinkle test.

dspp wrote: - In my experience there is a slight increase in set for the first month or so, but not very much. If you haven't got it set then lob it all back in the pan and carry on going.


I hope not much more of a set, it's pretty firm already!

dspp wrote: - Oh and often I buy the sevilles now but then freeze them to get to a convenient weekend for doing the job.


Implied is you freeze them whole. I have frozen satsumas before, but peeled and segmented. Funnily, I've not eaten much jam/marmalade for years (but do eat honey still), to cut down on carbs/sugars in the diet, so not totally sure why I jumped in now to make it, other than each winter I see Sevilles in the local greengrocers and keep thinking one year I'll give it a go. Mrs C doesn't 'do' jam so perhaps my now ~1.5lb will keep me going for quite a while. I do have a hankering to make another batch this weekend and see if I can catch it in a lighter set/lighter colour mostly for variety and to check I can vary my technique. I might also want a go at lemon & lime later in the year (I used to love the Roses one!).

johnstevens77
Lemon Slice
Posts: 271
Joined: November 9th, 2016, 6:14 pm
Has thanked: 195 times
Been thanked: 88 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#114525

Postby johnstevens77 » January 31st, 2018, 1:00 pm

Eat as soon as it is cool and set. As to the lemon zest/rind, I am too mean to throw it and always include it with the orange zest. I have made our marmalade for the year, golden shred jelly, and ginger. Nothing like home made.

john

dspp
Lemon Half
Posts: 5856
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 10:53 am
Has thanked: 4857 times
Been thanked: 1685 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#197004

Postby dspp » January 28th, 2019, 11:10 am

It is that time of year when I do my marmalade, and I did mine at the weekend. Nothing better than doing it on a rainy day in January. Each year I do 3kg of oranges with the Delia recipe and that makes enough (9 litres, right up to the meniscus if I reduce it and get it into the one maslin pan towards the end) to last us all year, with maybe a week or so of marmalade starvation before the Sevilles come round again if I have given a few too many jars as presents.

Each year I try to improve something, and this year I worked on my set. Last year's was a bit runny, but I got it right this year because I focussed on wring as much pectin out as possible from my muslin net. However this highlighted an issue I've had in the past, namely wringing out hot pips is hot on my poor hands. Yet if you leave it until they are cold then you don't get as much pectin out.

Has anyone any tips / tricks / widgets that they use to solve this ?

regards, dspp

Skotch
Lemon Pip
Posts: 76
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 4:43 pm
Has thanked: 44 times
Been thanked: 13 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#197064

Postby Skotch » January 28th, 2019, 2:36 pm

dspp wrote:It is that time of year when I do my marmalade, and I did mine at the weekend. Nothing better than doing it on a rainy day in January. Each year I do 3kg of oranges with the Delia recipe and that makes enough (9 litres, right up to the meniscus if I reduce it and get it into the one maslin pan towards the end) to last us all year, with maybe a week or so of marmalade starvation before the Sevilles come round again if I have given a few too many jars as presents.

Each year I try to improve something, and this year I worked on my set. Last year's was a bit runny, but I got it right this year because I focussed on wring as much pectin out as possible from my muslin net. However this highlighted an issue I've had in the past, namely wringing out hot pips is hot on my poor hands. Yet if you leave it until they are cold then you don't get as much pectin out.

Has anyone any tips / tricks / widgets that they use to solve this ?

regards, dspp


I think the way I do may help:

Its in 2 stages and the first stage uses a slow cooker overnight:

Essentially get your oranges and a whole lemon and prick them - add to the slow cooker with appropriate amount of water. Set it on a low setting for 6 hours (hence overnight is best). My slow cooker then keeps the contents on a warm setting

Next morning fish out the oranges/lemon and let them cool slightly.

Measure out the liquid.

When oranges/lemon are cool enough, cut unto quarters and scoop out all the the innards onto a square of muslin set inside another bowl. Draw up the muslin and really squeeze hard to extract as much 'goo' as possible. Add this to the cooking liquid and then top up to the required amount with water.

Tie a string around the muslin and then drop this into the pan you intend to use to boil the marmalade.

Shred up the peel to your liking, add it to the water along with the sugar - I tend to use a proportion of 2/3 of the fruit - ie 2kg sugar for 3kg of original weight of fruit.

Then boil and test for set.

This method has never failed me in over 20 years - hope that helps?

dspp
Lemon Half
Posts: 5856
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 10:53 am
Has thanked: 4857 times
Been thanked: 1685 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#197138

Postby dspp » January 28th, 2019, 6:15 pm

Thanks Skotch. A friend uses that method as well.

Anyone else got any tips on my 'hot hands' issue ?

regards, dspp

genou
Lemon Slice
Posts: 487
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 1:12 pm
Has thanked: 59 times
Been thanked: 155 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#197142

Postby genou » January 28th, 2019, 6:46 pm

dspp wrote:Thanks Skotch. A friend uses that method as well.

Anyone else got any tips on my 'hot hands' issue ?

regards, dspp


Do you own a ricer ?
This sort of thing: https://tinyurl.com/y7vo7p3x

dspp
Lemon Half
Posts: 5856
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 10:53 am
Has thanked: 4857 times
Been thanked: 1685 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#197150

Postby dspp » January 28th, 2019, 7:10 pm

genou wrote:
dspp wrote:Thanks Skotch. A friend uses that method as well.

Anyone else got any tips on my 'hot hands' issue ?

regards, dspp


Do you own a ricer ?
This sort of thing: https://tinyurl.com/y7vo7p3x


Gulp, no. Should I ?

Are you suggesting I should drop the cooked pips into that and squeeze firmly. If so, for a tenner, that sounds as if it would be just the thing. Do you do it this way ?

Looking on that website there are various brands. Is there a reason to go for anything else other than the cheapie ?

regards, dspp

johnstevens77
Lemon Slice
Posts: 271
Joined: November 9th, 2016, 6:14 pm
Has thanked: 195 times
Been thanked: 88 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#197165

Postby johnstevens77 » January 28th, 2019, 8:59 pm

No one mentioned using a pressure cooker! I make all our jams, jellies and marmalades with the aid of an old Prestige pressure cooker, I also use it for bottling fruit.
For jams and marmalade, use only half the stated quantity of water to soften the fruit or zest before adding the sugar to reach a set.

Seville Orange & Ginger Marmalade 23/01/2013 / 28/01/2014
(Pressure cooker recipe)
Ingredients
• 2 lbs Seville oranges.
• 1 lemon
• 1 pint water for the pressure cooker, (If no pressure cooker, then use 2 pints water and cook until the zest is tender, about an hour).
• ¼ pint water for second extraction
• ¾ pint water for final cooking with the sugar and lemon juice
• 4 lbs. sugar, warmed in the oven after sterilising the jars. (Helps the sugar to dissolve).
• ¾ of a 350 gr. Jar of preserved ginger with its syrup.
• Good tbls ground ginger.
• 35 grs root ginger sliced and added to pressure cooker.
• A piece of muslin and string.
• A pressure cooker with variable weights, i. e. a Prestige.
Method
1. Wash and dry the oranges and lemon and squeeze out the juice, preferable with a machine as this extracts more of the juice and thins the skins. Put the pips and any pulp into a piece of muslin, keep aside. Put the juice into the pressure cooker.
2. Using a spoon, scrape all the white pith from inside the juiced orange and lemon halves and add to the pips, tie the muslin up and add it to the juice in the pressure cooker.
3. Slice the orange and lemon skins as you like, (I make mine quite thick for this recipe). Put them into the pressure cooker with the pint of water and cook 20 mins @ 10 lbs pressure. Cool slowly.
4. Slice the preserved ginger and keep aside.
5. Remove the muslin and squeeze out as much of the thick pectin as you can, using a weight in a colander is a good idea.
6. Put the muslin in a pan and bring to the boil with the ¼ pint water, squeeze again and add all the extract to the rest of the liquid, transfer it all to a maslin pan.
7. Add the remaining ¾ pint of water, the warmed sugar, the ginger powder and the sliced ginger and syrup, bring to the boil and simmer for 1½ hours until a set is obtained, about 104°C. Remove the scum as you go. I use the flake test for this recipe.
8. Let it stand 15 mins. until a skin forms, stir gently and pour into warmed sterile jars. Cover with an air tight lid.

Makes about 2.1kg.

If anyone would like other recipes, please email me.

john

genou
Lemon Slice
Posts: 487
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 1:12 pm
Has thanked: 59 times
Been thanked: 155 times

Re: Marmalade - How Soon?

#197249

Postby genou » January 29th, 2019, 10:31 am

dspp wrote:
genou wrote:
Do you own a ricer ?


Gulp, no. Should I ?

Are you suggesting I should drop the cooked pips into that and squeeze firmly. If so, for a tenner, that sounds as if it would be just the thing. Do you do it this way ?

Looking on that website there are various brands. Is there a reason to go for anything else other than the cheapie ?

regards, dspp


I just drop the muslin bag in to the ricer and squeeze; works a treat. In terms of what to get, you want it robust enough to use, but I don't see any merit in going overboard. They make fantastic mashed potatoes.


Return to “Food”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests