Donate to Remove ads

Got a credit card? use our Credit Card & Finance Calculators

Thanks to 87investor,longview,Sussexlad,niord,staffordian, for Donating to support the site

Powered garden saws.

wildlife, gardening, environment, Rural living, Pets and Vets
Slarti
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 2947
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 3:46 pm
Has thanked: 649 times
Been thanked: 493 times

Powered garden saws.

#82714

Postby Slarti » September 22nd, 2017, 1:10 pm

Well I've managed to break my Black and Decker Scorpion reciprocal saw, apparently by pressing too hard.

I still have quite a lot of ivy trees (and others) to cut down and up while recovering the back of my garden, so does anybody have any recommendations for other DIY power saws for garden use?

I am somewhat nervous about the idea of a chain saw, but if that is the only other route, I'll also have to buy the protective clothing.


Any thoughts?

Slarti

Urbandreamer
Lemon Slice
Posts: 924
Joined: December 7th, 2016, 9:09 pm
Has thanked: 59 times
Been thanked: 243 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#82722

Postby Urbandreamer » September 22nd, 2017, 1:50 pm

Slarti wrote:I am somewhat nervous about the idea of a chain saw, but if that is the only other route, I'll also have to buy the protective clothing.


Any thoughts?

Slarti


Well my garden is too small to require a powered saw, but what do you mean by a "chain saw"? For example many companies make small pruning saws that use a chain to cut.

Have a look at this one which is intended for lopping small to medium sized branches rather than felling trees.
http://www.chainsawjournal.com/black-an ... alligator/
It works uses a chain saw motion, but the cutting zone is well out of the way and you have to use two hands (avoiding the good old bit of chopping your fingers like some do with a hedge trimmer).

Mike88
Lemon Slice
Posts: 564
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 6:17 pm
Has thanked: 69 times
Been thanked: 119 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#82729

Postby Mike88 » September 22nd, 2017, 2:02 pm

If you have to press too hard to make the saw achieve its objective I suggest a reciprocal saw is either not the tool to use or the tool you are using is inadequate for the job. However, a chain saw is mainly for cutting down trees and I would not use one for cutting ivy for example. Personally I use a chain saw for many jobs around the garden but rarely on shrubs and never on thin soft woody branches for example. I use a cheap Titan chainsaw from Screwfix:
https://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb355 ... GwodChIC-g

I have had mine for 5 years with no issues other than the occasional sharpen costing £10 at my local garden machinery centre.

Many people don't like electric saws because of the danger of cutting through the cable but I have had no such problems and in any case is always used with circuit breaker protection.

staffordian
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 1229
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 4:20 pm
Has thanked: 721 times
Been thanked: 309 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#82737

Postby staffordian » September 22nd, 2017, 2:31 pm

I had a well established hedge of around twenty laurel plants to cut down a while back, some with trunks almost six inches in diameter and after struggling with a couple of hand saws, I bit the bullet and bought a reciprocating saw from Screwfix:

https://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb533 ... 240v/17639

It was on offer for £48 at the time, which made it an easier decision.

I bought these blades:

https://www.screwfix.com/p/bosch-s1531l ... pack/71339

And the combination made relatively light work of the job.

I did find I needed to change the blades after a few trunks, they clogged with sticky sappy wood residue which seemed to reduce their cutting ability. And occasionally the blade would come loose from the saw, but that might well have been me attempting to force the blade a little.

Overall, I would definitely recommend it though for general garden work where a hand or pruning saw is too feeble but a chain saw is overkill.

Staffordian

Slarti
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 2947
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 3:46 pm
Has thanked: 649 times
Been thanked: 493 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#82759

Postby Slarti » September 22nd, 2017, 4:14 pm

Urbandreamer wrote:Well my garden is too small to require a powered saw, but what do you mean by a "chain saw"? For example many companies make small pruning saws that use a chain to cut.

Have a look at this one which is intended for lopping small to medium sized branches rather than felling trees.
http://www.chainsawjournal.com/black-an ... alligator/
It works uses a chain saw motion, but the cutting zone is well out of the way and you have to use two hands (avoiding the good old bit of chopping your fingers like some do with a hedge trimmer).


I mean any saw where a chain is powered round a frame by electric or petrol.

My fear is caused by the injuries (well the scars from them) inflicted on someone when a chain broke, and as the lower parts of my ivy trees are growing onto brick pillars in an ornamental wall, I am worried that if I am cutting into a 4" or 5" set of roots bound to the brick, when I get through to the brick the saw will kick back, or the chain break.

The Alligator is quite an impressive beast, but still a chainsaw. I'd have to think about that.

Cheers
Slarti

Slarti
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 2947
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 3:46 pm
Has thanked: 649 times
Been thanked: 493 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#82766

Postby Slarti » September 22nd, 2017, 4:25 pm

Mike88 wrote:If you have to press too hard to make the saw achieve its objective I suggest a reciprocal saw is either not the tool to use or the tool you are using is inadequate for the job. However, a chain saw is mainly for cutting down trees and I would not use one for cutting ivy for example. Personally I use a chain saw for many jobs around the garden but rarely on shrubs and never on thin soft woody branches for example. I use a cheap Titan chainsaw from Screwfix:
https://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-ttb355 ... GwodChIC-g

I have had mine for 5 years with no issues other than the occasional sharpen costing £10 at my local garden machinery centre.

Many people don't like electric saws because of the danger of cutting through the cable but I have had no such problems and in any case is always used with circuit breaker protection.


I suspect that it is not the tool that is the problem, but the tool using it.

I was getting tired and trying to push on faster than I should and so pressing harder than usual and possibly (probably) not keeping things straight.
I've had the Scorpion for just over 3 years and worked it quite hard in removing a Budlleia thicket where the core trunks were over 6 inches thick and this year have removed 4 ivy trees.

Did you know that if you leave ivy long enough it can turn into trees over 20' high?.
Mine get a 5' start from an ornamental wall and then one or more "trunks" up to about 4' thick shoot up.

Cutting the top growth off is not a problem, but removing the knot on top of the wall pillar is a real bugger!


If it can be cut with the loppers, then it is, but some bits are just too thick.

Cheers
Slarti

Urbandreamer
Lemon Slice
Posts: 924
Joined: December 7th, 2016, 9:09 pm
Has thanked: 59 times
Been thanked: 243 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#82768

Postby Urbandreamer » September 22nd, 2017, 4:26 pm

Slarti wrote:
Urbandreamer wrote: I am worried that if I am cutting into a 4" or 5" set of roots bound to the brick, when I get through to the brick the saw will kick back, or the chain break.

Slarti


TBH I might be concerned about most powered saws in that case. However you can get circular pruning saws.
ie
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ikra-Flexotrim ... B00B23S736

Slarti
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 2947
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 3:46 pm
Has thanked: 649 times
Been thanked: 493 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#83178

Postby Slarti » September 24th, 2017, 5:35 pm

Thanks for the thoughts all.

I've decided to go for the same again, especially as it is £10 cheaper than 4 years ago and will just have to be more careful.


Cheers
Slarti

bungeejumper
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 4459
Joined: November 8th, 2016, 2:30 pm
Has thanked: 1226 times
Been thanked: 1649 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#83554

Postby bungeejumper » September 26th, 2017, 8:54 am

We have forty fruit trees in our garden, most of them very old apples, and we also get our share of badly overgrown laurels, holly bushes and other awkward things. And, without wanting to second-guess the OP's requirements, we find that a good quality hand pruning saw ("pull saw") will get through a six inch trunk faster than most people would suppose. (10 minutes max, including rest breaks.) We once cut a forty foot sycamore in an hour and a half, although I wouldn't want to do that too often. :)

I am about as wary of chainsaws as it's possible to get. One of my schoolfriends was killed by one, and another has had too many close escapes for comfort. (Mostly, it has to be admitted, because his stance was wrong and he wasn't wearing the right clothing.) I was once given an electric chainsaw, and I couldn't wait to pass it on to somebody else. We have the usual bowsaws, but often we find that a simple pruning saw is just as fast and a lot more predictable in use. Just sayin'.

BJ

Slarti
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 2947
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 3:46 pm
Has thanked: 649 times
Been thanked: 493 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#84006

Postby Slarti » September 27th, 2017, 5:57 pm

bungeejumper wrote:We have forty fruit trees in our garden, most of them very old apples, and we also get our share of badly overgrown laurels, holly bushes and other awkward things. And, without wanting to second-guess the OP's requirements, we find that a good quality hand pruning saw ("pull saw") will get through a six inch trunk faster than most people would suppose. (10 minutes max, including rest breaks.) We once cut a forty foot sycamore in an hour and a half, although I wouldn't want to do that too often. :)

I am about as wary of chainsaws as it's possible to get. One of my schoolfriends was killed by one, and another has had too many close escapes for comfort. (Mostly, it has to be admitted, because his stance was wrong and he wasn't wearing the right clothing.) I was once given an electric chainsaw, and I couldn't wait to pass it on to somebody else. We have the usual bowsaws, but often we find that a simple pruning saw is just as fast and a lot more predictable in use. Just sayin'.

BJ


I've got a pruning saw and have used it, but I find I end up with cramps and spasms in the hands for a day or so after if I use it too much. Hence the power tool.

Slarti

Charlottesquare
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 1596
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 3:22 pm
Has thanked: 20 times
Been thanked: 179 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#91471

Postby Charlottesquare » October 28th, 2017, 9:57 pm

Northern Tools used to do a short blade rechargeable battery electric chainsaw for pruning that could be operated by one hand if really needed though had side handle for two handed use, bar for chain circa only about 8 inches long If I recall correctly, catch was the one I had the batteries seemed to have trouble taking a charge and after a fairly short period it stopped being used, in addition could not source replacement batteries.

Keep meaning to buy an extendable pole with petrol driven pruner as have a lot of trees at the overseas house.

If want to go the chainsaw route I really like Stihl, for a saw that only gets two operating sessions a year it needs little fettling to get going each season, the MS series are pretty decent and not that much more expensive than the budget brands, say £200-£300 but miles better than my previous McCulloch

JohnB
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 1252
Joined: January 15th, 2017, 9:20 am
Has thanked: 100 times
Been thanked: 281 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#285199

Postby JohnB » February 18th, 2020, 2:15 pm

I can recommend the Titan electric pole saw for work at a distance. Its very reassuring that the chainsaw is well out of range at the end of the pole, the biggest danger is dropping branches on yourself. But for ivy, get a pruning saw. I use a Silky Zubat, which is a Japanese 13" very high quality model, £60 but looks so sexy with its scabbard. I use it in my conservation work 2-3 times a week, I cut down 5 small elms yesterday, and ringed the ivy off 2 full size oaks last week. I let the professional rangers use the petrol chainsaws in our woods, but I'm not much slower for 4" trunks with my Zubat.

Always be cautious working near masonry, it will ruin manual or powered blades, use a wrecking bar to pull the ivy away before cutting it.

Our greatest foe in the Bromley nature reserves is Cherry Laurel, and I'm a demon attacking it with my Zubat.

scrumpyjack
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 1185
Joined: November 4th, 2016, 10:15 am
Has thanked: 71 times
Been thanked: 450 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#285203

Postby scrumpyjack » February 18th, 2020, 2:39 pm

I have had petrol and electric chainsaws for many years but never use the petrol one now. The electric one is ample for almost everything and so much lighter and easier to control (I use a Bosch one). When there is heavy duty tree work to be done I get the arborists in. Had to do that a few years ago after a storm and they took down 40 trees but you would really not notice it - there are so many left! I now have a lifetime supply of firewood but I suppose Greta would not approve of me burning it.

Ivy can be lethal for walls, especially brick ones where it can penetrate the mortar and literally rip the wall apart. The best place to cut it is down at ground level and let it then die.

JohnB
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 1252
Joined: January 15th, 2017, 9:20 am
Has thanked: 100 times
Been thanked: 281 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#285205

Postby JohnB » February 18th, 2020, 2:44 pm

If you ring a tree by cutting its ivy low down, its surprising how much falls out of the tree as it dies. A lot less disruptive than pulling it out alive.

bungeejumper
Lemon Quarter
Posts: 4459
Joined: November 8th, 2016, 2:30 pm
Has thanked: 1226 times
Been thanked: 1649 times

Re: Powered garden saws.

#285218

Postby bungeejumper » February 18th, 2020, 3:28 pm

JohnB wrote:If you ring a tree by cutting its ivy low down, its surprising how much falls out of the tree as it dies. A lot less disruptive than pulling it out alive.

And cut it twice, so as to leave a three inch air gap where the stem used to be. Ivy is capable of reconnecting. :)

In case of doubt, we tend to follow through by deep-drilling the ground-ward stem and filling the holes with stump killer such as SBK, before capping off with black plastic so that the wildlife can't come into contact with it. Agree that this doesn't meet with everyone's idea of green good practice. Works, though. ;)

BJ


Return to “The Natural World”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests