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Tyres

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daveh
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Tyres

#500086

Postby daveh » May 12th, 2022, 2:08 pm

I cycle to work on an e-mountain bike with 29x2.5 tyres. I got a puncture last night due small bits of stone stuck in the knobby tyres. I (and the bike) got a lift home from where I noticed the flat (not on the commute, at a friends farm). Some questions:

1) Is this a common problem, little bits of stone getting stuck in knobby tyres and working their way in far enough to cause punctures? Is there anything people do to stop it?

2) should I be replacing the tyre if this is happening?

3) How the hell are quick release through axles supposed to work - took me 30 mins to get it out this morning and that was before even starting on the puncture repair. Not sure I could have done it beside the road. The rear is also a through axle, but not quick release and that was much easier.

4) anyone got recommendations for a replacement tyre for the present 29x2.5 tyres that would be good for a commute on a mix of road and old railway, that have good puncture resistance. I'm going to need to replace both as the back is actually much more worn than the front which has punctured

5) the rims are tubeless ready. What are the advantages and disadvantages of tubeless and what happens if you get a puncture that doesn't seal with the gunge in the tyre?

servodude
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Re: Tyres

#500162

Postby servodude » May 12th, 2022, 10:47 pm

Exposure to flints are par for the course if you're commuting (and glass and nails) and the tyres fitted for most bikes sold for occasional/recreational use are not very puncture resistant (as it makes tyres more expensive and heavier)

I run Schwalbe Marathon Plus with slime filled tubes at high pressure on mountain bike rims; when I get a puncture it's from something you can pull out! If the slime has degraded by that point it becomes a bit of a fountain.

They're a bit narrower than the MTB cushions that were on it originally; but that just helps with rolling. They don't need to be the same width (fat soft tyres attract punctures)

Slime on its own can help a bit; but full tubeless seems a hassle, so I put it inside the tube :)

The quick release will need opened and wound out to get beyond the ubiquitous lip that seems superfluous - and then the wheel will catch on the brakes ;)

-sd

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Re: Tyres

#500200

Postby redsturgeon » May 13th, 2022, 8:59 am

Another vote for slime in your tubes...you can get pre filled ones.

I had a Kona MTB that came with the usual knobblies but they were so puncture prone even with slime I got a punctures most times I went off road with them. Once I changed them to something different I had no more problems.

Schwalbe Marathons are great but heavy (not such a problem for e bikes) but not sure they come in your size.

If it is mainly for commuting then I'd steer clear of knobblies, the knobs are chucnky but the rubber between can be thin.

John

daveh
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Re: Tyres

#500204

Postby daveh » May 13th, 2022, 9:40 am

redsturgeon wrote:Another vote for slime in your tubes...you can get pre filled ones.

I had a Kona MTB that came with the usual knobblies but they were so puncture prone even with slime I got a punctures most times I went off road with them. Once I changed them to something different I had no more problems.

Schwalbe Marathons are great but heavy (not such a problem for e bikes) but not sure they come in your size.

If it is mainly for commuting then I'd steer clear of knobblies, the knobs are chucnky but the rubber between can be thin.

John


You can't (as far as I Have found so far) get anything other than MTB oriented tyres in the 29" size even if you go for less width. The ones on it have been pretty good, this is only the third puncture in 7,500 miles of riding. I may go for the same (if still available - Scwalbe Smart Sam), but would like something with a bit less rolling resistance if possible. Very tempted to go for the slime inner tube, but was looking for peoples experience with tubeless. This bike is really difficult to fix a puncture, the through axles are a pain to get off particularly the front - though I may be doing something wrong - and the tyres are a difficult to get off the rim even with tools and at home, so was wondering if tubeless meant that you were very unlikely to puncture.

redsturgeon
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Re: Tyres

#500205

Postby redsturgeon » May 13th, 2022, 9:46 am

The main advantages with tubeless are less weight and the ability to run lower tyre pressures, neither of which would be an issue for you. You can get the Smart Sam plus which has extra puncture protection...did you have these already?

John

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Re: Tyres

#500207

Postby redsturgeon » May 13th, 2022, 9:52 am

Regarding the thru axle, never had a problem with them...what was the issue?

John

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Re: Tyres

#500223

Postby servodude » May 13th, 2022, 10:57 am

The through axle should only make a difference as far as not having a nut on it (aside from the fact their easier to snap - but normally that's on the rear)

It can take a bit of practice to get used to the amount of pressure needed to close/open them and then you need to deal with the lip (there was a page by Sheldon Brown back in the dawn of the internet that explained it was too do with lawyers!) but it should be pretty easy to see what's needed.

Slime in the inner tube will make the most difference - you can add that yourself
And then the puncture resistance of the rolling surface (which is where the Marathons excel)

Taking a tyre off is all about technique and your rims
- you need to imagine the bead in the middle of the rim ;)

-sd

daveh
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Re: Tyres

#500268

Postby daveh » May 13th, 2022, 2:13 pm

The through axles is not your standard quick release skewer. It has the quick release at one end, but the other end has a captured nut (that doesn't come off) and a device that springs out and is larger than the tube through which the axle passes, but can be made smaller to the size of the axle tube so the whole axle can be pulled through the tube (Note there are not normal dropouts on the forks). A bit like this one https://www.amazon.co.uk/SR-Suntour-15m ... 7992&psc=1 . Its just really difficult to pull the axle out without the sprung bit on the end springing back into the larger state.

Its possible that its just my incompetence as I'm used to normal quick release skewers where once the quick release is opened at one side and the nut screwed out at the other the wheel just comes out of the dropouts, this through axle seems very fiddly but is supposed to be tool free. The rear through axle is much easier but requires nuts removing before you can pull the axle out so requires appropriate tools.

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Re: Tyres

#500291

Postby Gerry557 » May 13th, 2022, 4:01 pm

Also look at slime liners, its like a bullet proof vest without any sticky mess. You could run both I suppose.

I normally carry a spare tube or two so in the unlikely event of a puncture its a quick wheel n tire off, inspect the inside of the tire to make sure you get rid of the object (you dont want to puncture the new tube) swap tubes, tyre and wheel back on. I use folding beads which go on and off much easier.

I used to get regular punctures, mainly from hedges getting cut a couple of time a week. The liners reduced that to one! I also claimed the free inner tube and new liner with the guarantee, so was well worth it.

redsturgeon
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Re: Tyres

#500307

Postby redsturgeon » May 13th, 2022, 5:11 pm

If you bought your bike locally I would suggest taking it back to the shop and asking them to demonstrate the "quick release". If they cannot get it off in less than a minute then I would suggest you have a claim under the sale of goods act. :D

John


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